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Current Research and Training

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Training Opportunities in Public Archaeology
and Heritage Interpretation

The Scottish Crannog Centre provides training opportunities and project work for tourism students and for those studying anthropology, archaeology, experimental archaeology, underwater archaeology, Celtic studies, and related disciplines. For 2015 we are seeking students of experimental archaeology who wish to initiate or continue research in prehistoric textiles, pottery, woodworking or metalworking. We can provide workspace and the opportunity to present to school groups and the general public. We cannot provide accommodation or subsistence but we can assist in finding an affordable suitable base. For further details or to apply for a voluntary placement, please contact us at info@crannog.co.uk.

Training in Underwater Archaeology - Courses 2015 at Kenmore, Loch Tay.

Dates and times to be confirmed.

Lots of fun with tape measures, pier structure, and site recording sessions!

HAZEL COPPICE IN PERTHSHIRE

Our crannog ancestors used hazel for many purposes and enjoyed the nuts the trees produced. Here at the Scottish Crannog Centre we have initiated several local coppice plots and we are always looking for support to sustain them. Please download our leaflet for more information. (Sorry, this may take a minute or so). For volunteering, please email info@crannog.co.uk if you would like to participate. Our coppicing team looks forward to welcoming you. See also a selection of our photos.

Our first funded coppice project was part-financed by the Scottish Government and the European Community Rural Tayside LEADER 2007-2013 Programme and Perth & Kinross Countryside Trust. This included a coppice conference on 19-20 April, 2013. Presentations on the biodiversity & economic benefits of coppicing hazel, case studies in Scotland, the value of networking, and future opportunities. Excursions to new sites being managed took place on each afternoon. Conference Venue: The Big Shed, Tombreck, by Lawers, Loch Tay.

A short report on the conference may be found in the Autumn 2013 issue of Reforesting Scotland.

Books of interest: Available from the Scottish Crannog Centre

The Carpow Logboat: A Bronze Age Vessel Brought to Life The story of the woodworking project in 2010 (see below) to create a Bronze-Age style logboat. Published by the Perth and Kinross Heritage Trust, this popular account costs £5 and is available now from the Scottish Crannog Centre.

Carpow in Context: A Late Bronze Age Logboat from the Tay Detailed monograph of the discovery, raising, and preservation of the Carpow logboat published by the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Featuring contributions from a range of specialists, this excellent hardback is now available at the Scottish Crannog Centre for £30.

Crannog Books Available

Crannogs of Perthshire by Dr Nicholas Dixon. This booklet provides an introduction to crannogs and covers recent underwater archaeological exploration and historical background for several of the more than 40 crannogs in Perthshire. 2009. Published by the Perth and Kinross Heritage Trust. Available from the Scottish Crannog Centre and local outlets. Paperback. Price £3. Contact: info@crannog.co.uk.

Also available, The Crannogs of Scotland: an Underwater Archaeology by Dr Nicholas Dixon, the leading authority on ancient Scottish loch-dwellings. Read about the discovery and history of these enigmatic ancient settlements, why they survive, the well-preserved archaeological remains, and the techniques of underwater archaeology. 2004. Tempus Publishing Ltd. Available from the Scottish Crannog Centre and all good bookstores. Paperback. Price £17.99.

Bronze Age logboat: Launch on Loch Tay

The logboat project was run jointly between the Scottish Crannog Centre, and the Perth and Kinross Heritage Trust (www.pkht.org.uk) who commissioned prehistoric woodworking specialist Damian Goodburn. He led the work to create a logboat based on the Bronze Age Carpow logboat which was raised from the River Tay. Participants used a range of hand tools including replica Bronze Age axes, adges and chisels. The boat was launched successfully and the maiden voyage took place on Tuesday, 1st September 2010 paddling across the loch to the Scottish Crannog Centre. The voyage took about 25 minutes with 6 people.

The boat is now available for visitors to hire, weather permitting.

 

 

 


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